Brazil Govcamp shows continued Gov 2.0 Global Growth

Brazil “BrasilGov2.0” Govcamp shows the Global Growth of Gov 2.0 and Open Government
http://www.brasilgov2.com.br/

Governments and the people they serve around the world are struggling to adapt to a new reality of real time information, demands for openness and transparency and more efficient service delivery. There is tremendous enthusiasm and interest in the utilization of social media, mobile and open data tools to remake the term “Government” as we know it.

Until recently, the majority of Government 2.0 initiatives were undertaken in places like the United States, Britain, Australia, Germany and Japan to name the leaders. The continued blossoming of this movement is taking hold in many other countries too like Brazil. Coming soon to Sao Paulo, Brazil is the next part of the dialog continuum.

Some recent examples of Open Government, and Gov 2.0 initiatives in Brazil:
http://www.webcitizen.com.br/en/tag/gov-2-0-summit/

and

http://shareable.net/blog/city-budgeting-gov-20-a-match-made-in-heaven

and

my friend Michael Walsh had this to say about Plone use in Brazil in a recent blog on Govfresh.

More on Gov 2.0 in Brazil:
http://www.brasil.gov.br/sobre/science-and-technology/open-source-software/open-source-software/br_model1?set_language=en This is an example of how the Government of Brazil is using Open Source software and solutions as an early adopter of the Open Government movement. So this makes Microsoft’s involvement even more inclusive and shows the depth to which this global company is looking outside itself as part of the effort to bring Government 2.0 and E-government to a reality around the world.

Government 2.0 requires the input, participation of many parties – obviously governments, also the big and small companies that service them, and of course the people. As a result there have been many conferences and “camps” that have sprung up to address the educational and collaborative needs of this emerging industry.

Microsoft is sponsoring Govcamp Brazil this coming June 8, 2011 with the idea of creating an open learning environment for anyone interested in Gov 2.0 in Brazil. While the event does require registration, it is open to all, whether Microsoft devotees or open source advocates. In fact, Microsoft is actively seeking the participation of as broad a group as possible to facilitate a collaborative dialog and create a new level of understanding. This represents a major part of Gov 2.0 – openness.

Rodrigo Becerra of Microsoft provided this insight:

“We believe that local communities have the passion, skills and insight to drive Gov 2.0 and OpenGov efforts on their own and we simply want to be able to provide a platform upon which they can dig deep into these issues. This is a space for creating connections to happen between citizens, organizations, groups and governments that may otherwise not exist. We have done them in Berlin, Mexico City, Colombia, Moscow, Russia, Toronto, Sydney, Wellington, Boston, Lisbon and will sponsor the Brazil event in the coming month. We specifically have local organizing committees run each event. We conduct them all in local language and invite social media, competitors and partners to revel in the discourse to help drive the progress of the Gov 2.0 movement.”

As the founder of Gov20LA in Los Angeles, California, I am thrilled to see how far and fast the Gov 2.0 movement is growing around the World. It is really encouraging to see this transformative change happening in places not often thought of for progressive thinking with regard to Government.

In full disclosure: I am an adviser to the Brazil Govcamp and am very excited to see what develops in this first ever Gov 2.0 Camp in Brazil.

The Digital Divide circa 2011

The Digital Divide.

 It is still here, getting better and worse at the same time. I have written about the digital divide often, including its implications for Government 2.0 or “Gov 2.0″ as it is commonly called.

My most recent post on the issue is: http://www.silberberginnovations.com/silberbergs-gov-2-0-blog/updates-on-digital-divide-and-gov-2-0/. However since I am writing this on a tablet it probably won’t show up as a live link due to difficulty in pasting. 

But I have a tablet, smartphone and until today a laptop. My laptop died an in-glorious death, slowly by 1s and 0s. In one day my consumption of information has dropped, and I have to work harder to achieve roughly same level of output as normal.

All of these are first world concerns. There are millions and millions of people to whom a phone is often located somewhere other than where they live. People to whom a tablet is a piece of rock or wood to work or cook on. These people don’t consume information – except that by the oldest social media there is, word of mouth. 

Many great organizations around the world are addressing the Digital Divide in their own way. But as the speed and consumption of information rapidly increases around the world, what is happening to those not part of this torrent?