Gov20LA 2014

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Gov 2.0 L.A. 2014 is 4/28/2014.

Emergency First Responders Get Free Admission to Crisis Management Talks at GOV20LA 2014 Led by Experts

 

Back-to-back earthquakes in Los Angeles and an 8.2 deadly earthquake and tsunami hitting Chile Tuesday night has raised questions and concerns about how prepared emergency first responders, educators, city officials, and citizens are in a world where things can happen in an instant and technology plays front and center.

 

“This is both a wake up call and a warning. The wake up call is to remember how quickly our sense of normalcy can change to instant chaos. The warning is to be prepared and in an age where social media and real life are so intertwined, all emergency responders should understand technological advances available to them and know how to use them– before we are all in a crisis scenario,” says government technology industry veteran and GOV20LA Founder Alan W. Silberberg.

 

With experts in cutting-edge advances in crisis management already scheduled to speak at the upcoming 2014 GOV20LA conference, Silberberg announces an open invitation and free admission for emergency responders, educators, and city officials in the greater Los Angeles area to attend, and says he will make the talks available as a live stream online for those unable to attend.

 

The panel will address the most critical and urgent information First Responders need during and after a crisis that will help them to save lives and property.  What is the most vital and valuable technology to have access to during an emergency? How to effectively establish best practices for communicating via digital channels during a crisis? What is the best technology available to communicate if telephone lines and the Internet goes down? How can organizers scale to handle volume of social media users during the frenzy of a crisis?  What data is important to prioritize needs? What measures will keep data secure in case of an earthquake where data is stored? All of these questions will be answered by leading experts including:

 

Who:

  • Alicia Johnson of the San Francisco City Office for Emergency Response
  • Bob Gourley, the former CTO of the Defense Intelligence Agency
  • Carmen Villadar, a former emergency room nurse and mobile technology analyst/futurist
  • Filiberto Gonzalez, the Los Angeles City Commissioner for North Valley Planning Commission

 

When: Monday, April 28, 2014

 

Where: Annenberg Beach House on the beach of Santa Monica, CA

 

Tickets to attend the talks live are limited and are available in advance through email request at Gov20la@gmail.com. They will be given on a first come, first serve basis and are expected to go fast. People wanting to watch the live stream are encouraged to sign-up for the event Facebook page to receive updates and a reminder before the stream begins here: http://bit.ly/GOV20LA2014

 

GOV20LA is an intimate and powerful conference held annually to bring together innovative leaders at the intersection of government, tech, and media from around the world in an apolitical setting. Every year, the conference covers breaking topics affecting citizens at large with leaders delivering insights into current gov tech issues and cutting-edge technology in an open town hall format such as the Darknet presentation by General Manager of Intel Peter Biddle and the Award-winning Social Media efforts of NASA JPL’s Mars Rover delivered by Veronica McGregor and Stephanie L. Smith at the 2013 event.

For more information on GOV20LA 2014 please visit http://gov20la.com.

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Gov 2.0 Listening in 5 World Capitals.

Change is here. It is happening everywhere. I have been fortunate in the last few months to speak and also do a tremendous amount of listening and asking pertinent questions of minister level officials in 5 national capitals, on 4 continents. The pace of change in government use and implementation of social media, gov 2.0, open gov, egov and various other monikers is extremely rapid, in some countries it is breakneck.

But still the old bogeyman is hanging around. Fear. I have written about the role Fear plays in the gov 2.0 and open gov discussions around the world, but this recent world tour just confirms that fear is still the largest inhibitor to successful implementation of new plans, and actually stops some excellent programs right in their tracks. I have personally witnessed the role fear plays with minister level officials down to low level staffers as well as with political functionaries in multiple countries. I have been in meetings just this year where fear is so palpable in the room; that literally nothing gets done with the exception of voices being raised in anger or out of frustration.

That being said, there are also tremendous advances being made – both those that have been officially sanctioned and budgeted and those where courageous government workers are sticking their necks out to test, take chances and experiment. More and more it is less the top down movements and more the individual workers who are making the real changes. Because a shift in acceptance of a new role; of a new place in the workplace is well underway.

But besides fear, economic concerns are also hitting this movement, both positively and negatively. In USA budgetary crisis are causing ripples up and down the Gov 2.0 movement as it is called here. But at the same time the budget crisis globally is refocusing anew the issue of legacy system investment versus investment in new technologies that are often more cost effective and much more efficient.
So pretty soon we will be crossing the chasm of decision making from supporting older legacy systems and protocols with the need to be competitive on a data basis in an increasingly competitive and real time 24/7 world.

The time to make decisions about abandoning old legacy systems with a sunk investment versus the new-found results and applications available for cheaper alternatives is upon our society, and much like Y2K there is at least partially a ticking clock. This time it is how long will current systems last before not being able to operate in a new world?

In Europe which is also facing severe economic contractions, the funding for these programs is in fact increasing for now, but that may change if the EU financial situation continues to get worse. Additionally, certain European countries need to make a mind shift from cyber space equaling protection of assets versus cyber space being a multilateral space where protections of freedoms are just as important.

Australia is committing funding and new initiatives that will drive the adoption of these practices, including the NBN (national broadband network) which will effectively wire most of the continent to be able to implement egov and open gov quickly.

Canada is struggling with funding issues and a perceived innovation gap – but at the same time it actively encouraging the open gov coalition and just recently announced a new web standards policy and it is clear that there are some powerful ministers and ministries looking to adopt egov and open gov sooner than later.

The UK is getting ready to reveal its next new initiative “GovUK” currently in Alpha, getting ready to be launched in Beta, which will serve a government wide portal along the lines of Govusa, but with a much more direct call to action and a major change in how UK gov websites will be run and maintained in the near coming future.

Russia has a small but extremely active egov movement, and there are surprising strides coming out of Russia, including a gov 2.0 proponent now running for the Duma on an open gov platform. But given Russia’s history of top down management of its people and government, the egov movement in Russia struggles against the state dominated ownership and manipulation of both the media, and the infrastructure necessary to provide open gov, like ISP’s government maintained choking of internet access and the ability to shut off the internet from the people in a very dramatic fashion.

What I have learned mostly though, is that the breakneck pace of change that has been rattling the government and e-government spaces since 2008 is having real results globally. I will leave it to others to pick apart my statements or point to specific case studies. But reality is social, mobile, cloud are here and have forever changed how governments interact with themselves and with us.

As published on Silberberg Innovations

The Mobile Gov 2.0 Influence

Mobility is the key. Government 2.0 and it’s namesake online “Gov 2.0” are already looking down the tunnel of version one – ie social media.

Version two is mobile. Mobile growth is explosive around the World. More and more people are using their mobile devices to become smarter, at least on the go smarter. Projected growth for mobile phones from the lowest phone only version to the smartest ones with “on-board life controls” is in the hundreds of percent over the next few years.

I have written about the Digital Divide many times.  The response has always been powerful. Why is this? Because it is a sensitive issue driven by fear of rich vs poor thinking. Unfortunately it’s true. As I have said before, a big part of the digital divide is now those “with smart phones” and those with “basic cellular” phones.  This is due to the increased mobility of our society as the continued economic realities around the world are changing living situations and human migration rapidly.

The person with the smart phone is able to go almost anywhere, find almost anything and be informed of alerts and information relative to their life no matter where they are. The person with the “basic” phone – or none at all does not. Pretty simple.

I caught a lot of grief for writing about the Social Darwinism of Gov 2.0 recently. Some people suggested I was loosely using a term I “did not seem to understand.” However, the economic situation is turning more and more of our society into us vs them/rich vs poor/smart info vs dumb or no info. I stand by what I wrote.

Just because the truth hurts does not mean it should not be told. The Mobile Gov 2.0 influence is already clear. Market leaders like www.citysourced.com and www.seeclickfix.com have been demonstrating that for a few years now. But there are a host of iphone apps and smartphone Gov 2.0 applications now available for download from dozens of companies. This past election showed the power of social media combined with mobile.

How many SMS messages were generated from a social media site visitation or share?

What percentage of the decision to vote was done through advanced, real time, mobile conversations flowing between campaigns and people’s pockets?

Think about that. Then think about how useful Government 2.0 applications become when the people, You 2.0, are in control – no matter where they are. This has huge implications on what is happening now, and what is to come in the next 18 months or so.

Look for the fusion of social media and mobility into Gov 2.0 in a real way. Look for how Government agencies start to be graded on their mobile access and Gov 2.0 access. Wait until the AARP or other large interest groups start issuing Gov 2.0 report cards along with the customary budgetary efficiency and policy effectiveness reports.