Look Back at Gov 2.0 L.A. 2012

It Was Amazing. Thank you to all who made Gov 2.0 L.A. 2012 a success for the 3rd year in a row. We had over 44,000 people participate in our livestream of the event from at least 19 countries.

A huge Thank You goes out to Callfire, Citysourced, Rockcreek Strategic Marketing, Davenport Institute, TechZulu, for sponsoring and making this event happen.

All of the videos will soon be posted on to our Vimeo Page at http://www.vimeo.com/gov20la and additionally we will be posting the presentations shortly as well.

Enjoy this Storify post about the various tweets, photos, blogs, etc coming out of this event.

[View the story “Gov 2.0 L.A. 2012 in Tweets, Pictures, Blogs” on Storify]

Rocking Citizen Power in 2012.

As the 3rd annual Gov 2.0 L.A. (Gov20LA) approaches on April 21, 2012; I have been thinking a lot about why I started this conference and what it means for you, for me and for our futures. A few years back I wrote this piece “What is Gov20LA All About?”

In the 3 years since we have seen huge growth in social media, cloud computing, mobile technologies and the subsequent explosion of citizen involvement with our governments. This has caused all kinds of situations, good and bad. On the good we are seeing country after country begin to adopt open data and transparent aspects to their internal and external operations. We have seen citizens empowered to use their voice, many for the first time ever. We have witnessed several countries fall to “soft power” of people organizing, and then acting on the organization to effect change of a type we have never seen in our collective human history. On the bad, we are seeing totalitarian governments around the world cling to these new technologies and indeed even the people’s response to them; to crack down, imprison people, kill people and break up organized groups.

I have written in the past about the two headed side of #gov20 and social media in general with regard to Governments and the people who interact with them. This dichotomy is growing, not abating. We see people using technologies to force change yet at same time we are witnessing governments around the world investigate the same technologies to prevent change.

Gov20LA was created to act as a forum to collect the best and brightest people and their ideas and enable them to tell the world their stories. The idea has always been to empower people through learning about the cutting edge applications of technology in government and by the companies servicing them. We feel that by letting you see the speakers in a casual, yet live setting online – we all can learn from the human conversation and dialogue.

Technology is great, solves lots of problems and saves money when properly applied. The problem with most technology conferences and events is they are too jargon laden and usually do not encourage open dialogue with the speakers. We do the opposite. We want the dialogue. We want our speakers interacting both with the live audience in the room and the global Internet TV audience. So we have created an open environment, with some truly amazing people from inside and outside government leading the dialogue.

I am personally so humbled and excited by the continued awesome response Gov20LA receives worldwide. I can’t wait for this year. Join me. Thank you.

3 Themes for Gov 2.0 LA 2012 (and it’s our 3rd year!)

The third Gov20LA is coming up soon. In fact in April of 2012 at the same location as this year.

As we have in the last two years, the event will be fully live-streamed and interactive with twitter, facebook, chat.

We are past the point where the “Gov 2.0” in our name does more than evoke recognition. It is time to focus not on the theoretical but on the practical. This past year the world has witnessed upheaval and change on a scale that is new to all of us. When we did Gov20LA this year – Tunisia had just fallen, and the crisis in Egypt was just erupting in full; we had a collection of the some the world’s leading thinkers about guess what, social media in times of crisis and governments. It was to be sure pretty amazing timing. Hopefully the drama this coming year will once again be focused on the amazing speakers we will soon be announcing and the world eyes will be watching us with the ability to learn without being present in the room necessarily.

The three themes of this upcoming Gov20LA are going to be:

1. Business inside Government and how it is rapidly becoming different, things like SCRM are being deployed and government is basically being forced to restructure itself.

2. Goverments’ use and management of social media in crisis like the earthquake, hurricanes, riots.

3. Engagement is now being taken as a for granted thing, “everyone has a facebook page” but how real is it and how are crowd-sourcing and public private partnerships re-arranging the landscape?

We are requesting two things from you.

1. If you would like to submit a panel idea or speak please contact us here.

2. We will be issuing a follow up post before January 1, 2012 with regard to sponsorships and corporate opportunities, but if you are interested in sponsoring the event or some part of it, please contact us at Gov20LA@Gmail.com. Once again we appreciate all of the previous sponsors of the past two years, and could not have done it without each and every company and person who stepped up to sponsor the event.

Trust, Transparency and the Gov 2.0 Triage

Republished from http://www.silberberginnovations.com

Lately there has been lots of news about a breakdown in trust of those in Government. Bell, California is just the latest obnoxious example of gross malpractice and criminal activity in a Government. Trust is something we have always tried to demand from those running our Governments. It does not always work out that way though. One would think that with social media we would have become more aware. One would think that with “OpenGov” initiatives sprouting up like weeds the days of Government officials doing things in secret would be over. Don’t go to Vegas and bet on that.

    If anything, there is a dark side to Gov 2.0 – that it may conveniently offer up yet another bureaucratic layer if not implemented carefully.

I have been working on a political campaign this cycle. It’s blog was hacked recently, and attempts were made to hack the website too. In this case the hacker is known to the campaign, and is being dealt with appropriately. But it brought another side of the trust prism to light: through social media we let total strangers “into” our lives, both digitally and sometimes literally. Little things that seem innocuous suddenly loom huge. Strangers get to peek in, you get to in return. To what end? How does this flow to the people’s oversight of the Government?

Recently I wrote about the need for the “G” chip – my name for it. My point, and I am going to quote from what I wrote:

” * How do you know when you go from a commercial site to a government site? This will become a more complicated issue as governments start rolling out new sites with commercial elements on them.

* How do you know if the government site you are on is using persistent tracking cookies or other web information services to not only identify you but deliver appropriate services?

* How do you know if the government site you are on has partnerships with another company; say, Google? Whose terms of service are you under?

My anti-virus program uses red and green lights to indicate safety of my system and safety of websites I may be visiting. Perhaps we need a “G” chip dashboard with a similar layout. One that lets you know you are crossing into government owned e-space, and one that alerts you to different persistent tracking techniques, and one that alerts you to multiple Terms of Services on one site.”

This would go a long way towards addressing the the open wounds that failures in trust and transparency have created. A “Triage” if you will from Gov 2.0 and even You 2.0. But there is more to it than just knowing where you are and how you got there. Part of what the Gov 2.0 Revolution is inspiring beyond new companies and and ideas into a new way of Governing too.

Gov 2.0 will be meaningful in a very deep way when it transcends from a nifty way to do something to an embedded and permanent transparency window into how our Government officials serve us, the people.

The many Voices of Gov 2.0

Republished from Silberberg Innovations.

Government 2.0.
Let that sit there for a second.
The term is widely credited with having been invented by William Eggers. If you do not know who he is, it may be because others would like you to think they came up with the term. Don’t let them fool you.

The Gov 2.0 World is Growing Fast. I have said that on many occasions and written it all over the place. One of the reasons it is growing so fast is that despite efforts to the contrary – there has been and continues to be more than one voice representing the Gov 2.0 Revolution. This is a vitally important and crucial aspect of the continued organic growth in this space. Collaboration and ideas flow together naturally. When an un-natural dam is placed in that flow, it merely diverts the flow, but does not stop it.

The past three years have been an exciting time for many, here in the United States and abroad. The voices in Government 2.0 abound. Below I have chosen to list just some of the ones that come to the top of my head and also ones you may never have heard of and are in no particular order. So in addition to the cast of the “usual suspects” we all know and read each day in the #gov20 stream on Twitter and elsewhere, I offer some others.

Dominic Campbell
Nick Charney
Craig Newmark
Luke Fretwell aka Govfresh
Seth Grimes
John F. Moore
Karine Barzilai-Nahon
Gwyn Kostin
Mike Kujawski
David Osimo
Lovisa Williams

Something to think about as the Gov 2.0 world heats up: The inclusion of voices; acceptance of different types of events, camps, conferences is a critical part to all of us growing this into not only an industry, but one where the freedom of ideas runs parallel with the hard nosed business tactics already being deployed.