GOV20LA Organizing Committee and More Information

Government 2.0 Camp: LA

Http://www.Gov20LA.org – FREE to Individuals thanks to Sponsoring Companies.

You’ve been hearing rumors of some LA “Camp” thing. We are here to let you know that you don’t have to wait until Summer time for Camp! In order to get a dose of sunshine and inspiration Gov 2.0 Camp is moving out of the Beltway and off to sunny Los Angeles, CA. You may be asking, why take the Camp on the road, outside of the obvious reason of early Spring Break?

The first Government 2.0 Camp in Washington, DC was a great way to bring awareness to who is working on these issues and how to start working together. Now, that we know who’s who in the space, it is time to start including the rest of the community. That community is made up of people like you.

  • Government cannot hope to provide better services to our citizens, integrate social media and develop new ways of doing business without the help of the entire community.
  • When we talk about Government here, we aren’t just talking about the Federal Government.
  • We are talking Federal, State, local and international.
  • Yes, you heard right! This is all about contributing to finding better ways to make the world work.

It isn’t about one of us, but all of us as global citizens
What are we looking for? We’re looking for your ideas, your best practices and your creativity. We want you to bring your energy and enthusiasm for helping us figure out how we can modernize Government using social media. We are looking for ideas on:
• Continue implementing innovative solutions
• Leverage ideas and lessons learned from Non Profits, Education, other Governments, Non-Government Organizations and private companies
• Increase and support more women in technology
• Start the conversation across all levels of government and beyond
• Address the challenges of government – privacy, legal, records management, accessibility, copyright, creative commons, security and more!
• Provide insights in language use and how best to position transformational technology change.

Most importantly, we are looking for ways to help citizens better participate in Government. How can we empower them? How can we help their voices and opinions to be heard? How do we make Government and Government officials more accessible? How do we help people trust the job the Government is doing? We need your help to make this a reality!

Who Should Attend?
Any one who is interested in helping make governments better and who has an interest in social media.

When?
Friday, February 5 – Sunday, February 7, 2010

Where?
The location of the Camp is still TBD. We are working on procuring a location in West Los Angeles.

Why Attend?
This will be the first time we have gone out of our way to practice what we preach and see real world applications in actual use. Come to Los Angeles to get a fresh perspective and to explore new ways of doing business.

Structure of the Conference:
This will not be like any other conference you have ever attended. We will be utilizing a hybrid of the bar camp format, traditional conference structure thus taking community interaction to the next level.

The Planning Committee will provide sub themes for the Camp (some of which have been highlighted above). We will select some speakers and panel sessions to meet some objectives of those sub themes. There is plenty of room for you to propose your own sessions and ideas.

In order to ensure we develop the right discussion, we will conduct community voting on all community submitted proposals. Space will be limited and number of slots per sub theme will be announced before the end of voting. Expect voting to begin in January 2010!

Now What?
Register to attend the Camp here. Determine if you or your organization would like to sponsor the Camp. Think about ideas you have for a session or if you have a recommendation for a speaker(s).

Still Have Questions?

Contact us at register@Gov20LA.org or on Twitter at @Gov20_LA . Also, don’t forget to ask your friendly Planning Committee member any additional questions you may have! They are here to ensure we provide the best camp experience ever!

Gov20LA Planning Committee:
Alan W. Silberberg, Lovisa Williams, Steve Ressler, Erin Kotecki Vest, Adriel Hampton, Sarah Granger, Jim Gilliam, Andrew Lachman, Greg Ferenstein, Lucretia Pruitt, Andrea Baker, Rich Greenberg, Luke Fretwell, Michael Walsh, Martha Mclean, Justin Herman, Mona Nomura, Chris Heuer, Meagen Ryan, Wayne Moses Burke

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20 thoughts on “GOV20LA Organizing Committee and More Information

  1. I do not like the implication that the Gov 2.0 Camp I co-hosted in DC in March 2009 was not inclusive. People traveled from as far away as England to be there.

    I do not like the implication that the Gov 2.0 Camp in DC was only about the Federal government. That was absolutely not the case.

    I do not like the implication that Gov 2.0 Camp is something unique to DC and now LA. Numerous other cities and even countries started planning their own camps immediately after the original.

    I do not like the implication that “we” (whomever that is) know “who’s who in the space” – there are many undiscovered talents working on Gov 2.0 right now.

    I do not like the implication that Gov 2.0 Camp LA will “start the conversation across levels of the government” – it has been going on for some time. Perhaps someone didn’t notice that, for example, all the winners of the Gov 2.0 Expo Showcase lived outside the Beltway, and four of them worked on non-Federal issues?

    I do not like the implication that Gov 2.0 Camp LA will be “unlike any conference you have ever attended” merely because it is a hybrid between a barcamp and a traditional conference. I attended one of those last week.

    I do not like the implication that “This will be the first time we [again, whomever that is] have gone out of our way to practice what we preach and see real world applications in actual use” at all. Was that statement dreamed up out of thin air?

    • The world is a big place. There are lots of different approaches, and lots of different practical ideas. While your points above could be taken apart one by one, as I have said consistently to you over the last few months, we would like your involvement; and will put on a powerful event with or with-out it. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

    • It has been a good few days since these comments on Gov20 Camp LA first appeared, and while some people familiar with the behind-the-scenes factors that most likely brought about its posting have said it is an emotional appeal not worth responding to, I feel that for those who do not know the inevitable human factors that shape these actions, or are following with keen interest the dialogue on government innovation, for these folks I must set the record straight – the rest already know or suspect.

      For the purposes of this comment, Mark, I must point out that a common ‘debate’ tactic of yours is to deliver a hit job, then retreat to a higher road by admonishing any response as personal attack on your impassioned commentaries “made for the good of the community” – this latest post, this hit job, has however made the path to a higher road too treacherous for even you to climb. And so you will have to bear with me, here on the ground, as I address your comments and hold them accountable.

      Gov20 Camp LA is an upcoming event to foster discussion and collaboration on innovation across the government landscape, an event shaped by the community, driven by attendee participation, whose ultimate success and value can be judged only by the ideas and energy brought to it by those who take the time to sit at the table.

      The volunteer organizing team draws from extremely diverse experiences in government innovation, from grassroots organizers to the State Department and Intelligence community, from backgrounds in Congress, a former Administration and the military to those who engage the public discourse with the most powerful tool of all – their voice.

      I get the feeling from your comments, however, that you feel you stand to lose something from this occurring – and if the case, I think you may be right.

      We use terms like transparency and inclusion to bring more voices to sit at the table of decision in government. Each mission is different, each need is different, but in each their own way we look for ways to apply innovations in order to improve processes, and give individuals the strength to understand or even participate in what was once the exclusive playground of the ‘Good Old Boys Club’ as some would say, whether created by power, educational or privilege hierarchies.

      Some, however, have used Government 2.0 tools instead as a means to try to make themselves a member of the Good Old Boys Club. You speak always “for the good of the people” and are quick to remind anyone who will listen that you lead a community, that you move needles, and that you have the community’s best interests in heart – criticism of your comments or approach become not just that, but a criticism of the community itself.

      We should be grateful to have such a benevolent patron – for someone whose actual government experience is limited to a research fellowship at NDU, being a prolific Twitterer and community spokesman has been good to you. You are invited to sit on panels, contribute to blogs, attend the parties many actual government innovators don’t attend because they are on government salary or have their work to do, and at times you can even be praised for slapping down participant, community-driven events like the ones that put you on the map out of fear that someone might follow your trail of breadcrumbs and spoil the self-perceived level of prestige.

      As many know, you now work with Tim O’Reilly, who to many is the embodiment of everything Government 2.0 aims to break up. He creates prestige events that attendees must pay thousands of dollars to register for in order to gain access to his tent – a tent which you now call home, as your post thoroughly illustrates with your plugging of Gov20 Expo and the rest.

      Mark, a reasonable, community driven event like Gov20 Camp LA will not threaten the business model you are now a cog in. I should rephrase that – Gov20 Camp LA ‘alone’ will not threaten that business model.

      Gov20 Camp LA is not about you, despite your perceived role in the community. You don’t have to attend, you don’t have to read about it – if it makes you bristle that this Government 2.0 event is being held and you have nothing to gain from it, do what I do with your Twitter feed: don’t follow it.

      The participants of Gov20 Camp LA, and any other similar event, will determine its own value – and you may find it surprising, but many find an inherent value with an event that isn’t under your current tent.

      A long comment from me, I know, but it went quickly. I’ll end with quick responses to each of the points you made on the You2Gov blog which I think could far more concisely sum up whats going on here.

      Comment: “I do not like the implication that the Gov 2.0 Camp I co-hosted in DC in March 2009 was not inclusive. People traveled from as far away as England to be there.”
      Response: It’s not about you, Mark, its about Government 2.0.

      Comment: “I do not like the implication that the Gov 2.0 Camp in DC was only about the Federal government. That was absolutely not the case.”
      Response: It’s not about you, Mark, its about Government 2.0 – is there a theme here?

      Comment: “I do not like the implication that Gov 2.0 Camp is something unique to DC and now LA. Numerous other cities and even countries started planning their own camps immediately after the original.”
      Response: You’re taking a creative hook out of context and presenting it literally. Will you also criticize the use of Spring Break when clearly February is not Spring?

      Comment: “I do not like the implication that “we” (whomever that is) know “who’s who in the space” – there are many undiscovered talents working on Gov 2.0 right now.”
      Response: You’re taking a creative hook out of context and presenting it literally. Will you also criticize the use of Spring Break when clearly February is not Spring?

      Comment: “I do not like the implication that Gov 2.0 Camp LA will “start the conversation across levels of the government” – it has been going on for some time. Perhaps someone didn’t notice that, for example, all the winners of the Gov 2.0 Expo Showcase lived outside the Beltway, and four of them worked on non-Federal issues?
      Response: Nice plug for O’Reilly, but its not about you – I thought this was already established.

      Comment: “I do not like the implication that Gov 2.0 Camp LA will be “unlike any conference you have ever attended” merely because it is a hybrid between a barcamp and a traditional conference. I attended one of those last week.”
      Response: Creative response, not about you, broken record.

      Comment: “I do not like the implication that “This will be the first time we [again, whomever that is] have gone out of our way to practice what we preach and see real world applications in actual use” at all. Was that statement dreamed up out of thin air?”
      Response: After writing all of this, I’m now thinking that WAS about you.

      In short – and I myself will lend you a hand in climbing back up to the high road – its not about you, its not about Tim O’Reilly, and knowing at least some of the people attending, including myself, I am confident Gov20 Camp LA will be great. No one will confuse its value with that of prestige events like Gov20 Expo, if nothing else because there are women on Gov20 Camp LA’s organizing committee.

      I apologize for that last zing, but I suppose I just decided to take the “Mickey Mouse” gloves off you referenced – and now that I am done, I’ll go wash my hands of it in some of that kool-aid.

  2. Everyone is entitled to their own approach. O’Reilly Media approaches Gov 2.0 very differently than, say AFCEA. I think that’s fine because both of their approaches are logical within some framework, and don’t overpromise. As I stated above, and as I mentioned to you long ago, I think there is over-promising here, a good deal of hype, and some inconsistencies and phrases that don’t seem to make sense to me. I’d love to see the event more rigorously defined and see it be successful. But at present I don’t necessarily get that vibe. I’m curious to hear the rest of the planning committee weigh in on these issues.

  3. Pingback: The Gov 2.0 Camp LA Drama: Lessons for Community | Technosailor.com

  4. I think Mark’s comment was in a negative tone and I feel bad he interpreted the efforts by this committee to that side of the spectrum.

    As part of the planning committee of the first Government 2.0 Camp in Washington DC I am able to bring best practices from that event, as well as others to help this one be a success in its own right. Additionally, this event is expecting a new breed of participants. As there are many all over the world as we know that would have liked have attended that event, now have another chance gather.

    As I read above, it never states that there was not diversity in representation of global citizens or types of Government. And such diversity will also be solicited for this future event as well as others.

    I do know there have been smaller Government 2.0 camps in other cities, was it Oklahoma City? (Brain is a little foggy this Monday AM).

    I don’t think we can promise enough for this event. The ideal is to get citizens and Government to think outside of the box to create programs, solutions, and better practices in Open Government, efficient Government, and stronger voices for Citizens.

  5. I’m a bit confused here. O’Reilly put on a great conference with the Gov2.0 Camp in Washington DC last March from all reports.

    This conversation seems to have devolved from “we’re excited about what we’re bringing to the LA Gov2.0 Camp” to point-by-point dissection and lengthy posts implying that someone (the other guy) is being less that genuine.

    Is this post a little glossy and maybe hyperbolized? Sure.
    Because who the heck would attend a conference without any innovation?
    Should it say “it will be just like every other conference and since someone did one in DC last March you probably won’t really be interested in this one, so why bother, but hey if you really want to come…” instead? Of course not. Who in their right mind would find something like that appealing?

    Mark: I hope that you find good, compelling reasons to change your mind over the next few weeks – that’s the objective I think all of us on the planning committee have: to plan an event that people WANT to come to, will have reasons to look forward to, and will be eager to participate as well as having valuable take-aways.

    It is my belief that when someone criticizes your work, it is not necessarily a reflection of your person. It doesn’t look interesting to Mark? Great, we’ll incorporate that into our thinking as we plan.

    There is more than enough space in the world (and in this corner of it in particular) to encompass many, many “Gov2.0″ camps. Because it’s not Gov2.0 if we’re not participating.

    I’m happy to learn from Mark’s comments elsewhere that there’s a Gov2.0 Denver in the works – since I live here, it will be much easier for me to get to that than to LA – but then, I’d like to go to both. I’m not convinced that Gov2.0 practicioners and advocates have yet realized that we are not as geographically dependent as we once were.

    I am a voter. I’m on the Internet. Therefore, I can be anywhere.

  6. @Lucretia — O’Reilly (the company) was not involved in the planning or execution of the original Government 2.0 Camp. But I was and I am bringing my lessons learned to LA.

    O’Reilly did I think contribute sponsorship funds I believe.

    I think its Awesome that Denver is also planning an events.

  7. As the initial organizer and planner of Gov20LA – I thought I have been careful to not only seek input from all who were on the original Government 2.0 Camp Planning Committee for the March ’09 event in DC; but to thank all of you and acknowledge what you did by building off of it.

    That being said, I have been developing a lot of the background planning, the execution of the website in a quiet way, getting our “mickey mouse” ears in a row; if you will. :-)

    Within days the planning committee will be receiving the first major communication from me, as well as having a conference call on many of the areas discussed above.

    I will reveal this: There are at least two Emmy and Golden Globe Winning writers who will be running a panel on the language in technology, how to make it more simple and easier for people to achieve buy in with.

    Several Government agencies on the West Coast have approached the Camp about presenting some case studies about implementation and integration of social media tools across wide and diverse sets of Government applications.

    Additionally, Microsoft will bring some of their social media team to demonstrate integrative tools they have developed that work cross platform with their products and JOOMLA and DRUPAL.

    The event is going to have tremendous support from the community and we will be announcing the support from broad Government coalitions and inter-agency work groups shortly.

    The blogs and other materials written to date have not been misleading at all.

    1. It is a hybrid event. This means it will take on multiple characteristics – but will be focused and results driven.

    2. The tools to support the camp have mostly been put on http://www.gov20la.org through the social network, groups, forum and we have made it easy and transparent for people to be involved. More tools are available and will be deployed like live video streaming and archiving, live twitter stream integration, and social media tools to support conversations at multiple levels.

    3. I personally have made it my mission to be inclusive, open and direct about who is involved, where the camp is going and how it will be achieved. This will continue through the posting of panel decisions, speaker decisions, committee decisions on http://www.gov20LA.org.

    4. We are doing this event in Los Angeles for many reasons, but here are a few: America’s Second Largest City. America’s Second Largest Media Market. Hub of Technology, Defense, Aerospace, Entertainment and Politics. Most of the Government 2.0 truly innovative companies are West of the Mississippi.

    5. As the founder of http://www.you2gov.org – I am not surprised by “attacks” on innovation or leadership. Innovation and executed ideas often bring about negative reactions – many times simply out of self preservation. I don’t think Mark was or is attacking me or the idea of the Camp. But I hope this whole episode just is one more good thing for the Government 2.0 Community to get over; as it transforms itself from an infantile new industry sector into an ever growing one headed towards adolescence.

  8. Hi all –

    As an interested Gov2.0’er, an honoured and excited member of the planning committee I think the discussion taking place above speaks volumes to the passion people hold for the evolution and success of the Gov2.0 movement.

    No one conference, change camp, unconference or other event will ever be able to address the varied and numerous challenges Governments of all levels face.

    As a Canadian, I’ve had the pleasure of attending #w2e in San Francisco, speaking at a conference in Philadelphia and participating in numerous conferences here at home and around the world – just as many of you have. The connections and intelligence they’ve offered me have been invaluable, including my membership on the planning committee for Gov2.0LA.

    The themes selected for this event; its openess and inclusiveness do not make it unique. It simply provides yet another venue and opportunity for all us to to build on the success, as Andrea points out, of past events and to raise the bar.

    We are aiming to bring governments together and to provide value, start new discussions, build on old ones, and continue the momentum.

    And let’s remember what happened to “I do not like them Sam I am.” If memory serves, he ended up loving them. Here’s hoping we have fewer “I do not like’s” and more “I’m ready to try and talk.”

    Here’s to continued discussion and progress.

    Cheers
    Martha
    @mjmclean

  9. Awesome response Alan. Looking forward to talking with you more about it all next week.

    @Andrea – I believe I knew that, was half replying to comments above about O’Reilly being everything wrong with 2.0 – they aren’t in my book.
    But really glad to know that you are here and bringing your experience into the mix! :)

  10. Excellent response Alan, I’m very excited about Gov20LA and have registed as a sponsor for the event to show my support.

    I hope that Mark’s comments provide motivation and inspiration to the GOV20LA planning team and not just a reminder of Carly Simon’s song You’re So Vain.

  11. I don’t understand, Alan. You write in the first paragraph above, “…Gov 2.0 Camp is moving out of the Beltway and off to sunny Los Angeles.”

    But as others wrote in the comments, many communities have held, and continue to hold, barcamps based on the DC model. So, how is this LA event any different than what’s happening in Denver, Boston, and London, among other places?

    I take offense from that extracted quote because you’re not moving anything; you merely convening another event in another city. Perhaps that’s why Mark’s up in arms; if so, I don’t blame him.

  12. Unless you or someone has the funds to fly me to LA and put me up on someone’s couch, I don’t think I can make it. That is, until income stability enters my life which is not the status quo.

  13. Gov2.0 LA Camp is gearing up to be the event of 2010 on the West Coast!!

    “Refreshing, innovative engagement, openness, flexible to new ideas, citizen participation…” these are thoughts that resonate with me as I review the great content and upcoming lineup of activities.

    The agenda sounds very impressive but most compelling about this event so far is the leadership and passion of the planning committee. You know this will be an event you will not want to miss!

  14. I think I need to do my part by dusting the couch in our suburban LA home – and then watching airfares – as I can’t imagine any of us (especially Ari and Mark) missing *any* event their schedule permits to further our common mission.

    Yes, debate and passion are good – but for every upside of being in [name a city] there are always as many downsides.

    I hope my schedule will permit me to meet many of you in Los Angeles.

    Brian

    Gov2.0 is achieved when we stop shoveling money and start stacking ingenuity.

  15. Brian,
    Thanks so much for your continued support and I truly hope you can make it, if not you need to send someone else from LAFD to speak about your awesome use of social media in emergency communications! We will make a special place for you. For whoever gets to crash on Brian’s couch, you will likely be staying on the safest couch in Los Angeles, hand down!

    I may have to roll out a futon or two as well! :-)

  16. Pingback: Most Tweeted Articles by Government 2.0 Experts

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